Chinenye’s ‘Lessons From Twenty Somethings’ charts path for millenials

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Yinka Olatunbosun
Writer, entrepreneur, and winner of WawaBook Literary Fellowship 2018, Veralyn Chinenye, has announced the publication of her mini-autobiography, Lessons From Twenty Somethings. The book, set to be released on October 10, 2020, is a deeply personal account of her learning, quest, curiosity, experiences and travels in her twenties and offers hands-on advice and lessons for young people at every stage of their twenties.

‘Lessons From Twenty Somethings’ chronicles Veralyn’s life, her purpose, failures and successes and how young people can shorten their learning curve by leaning on her story to navigate their journey, create their own path and make quality decisions that will make their twenties great. The author engages her audience with real-life stories and relatable experiences, with a sprinkling of sparking poetry that intersperses it. The title is practical, highly educative, inspiring and entertaining. Some of the lessons covered in the book include leadership, breaking stereotypes, taking risks, the art of gratitude, the science of questions and answers, God, and the value of family.

The book comes with a peg of resources to help millennials take full charge of their twenties into thirties and includes a gratitude journal, a productivity worksheet and an exclusive 30 days mentoring hangout with over 10 of the author’s best mentors like Grace Ihejiamaizu, Emeka Nobis, Esther Eshiet, Dunsin Fatuase and fourteen other great mentors.

‘Lessons From Twenty Somethings’ is a guide every young person must read. People in their twenties will glean numerous lessons from her life experiences since most young persons in Nigeria rarely share their stories in a candid and vulnerable manner, but prefer to wait till they get older. This is a campass that helps young people avoid some of the pitfalls of those vulnerable years of growing up.

Chinenye’s life choices and her ability to transcend society’s playbook of how a young person should live serve as a bridge for young people who are both afraid and not afraid to chart their own course.

From her gut and her constant refusal to settle for stereotypes, her personal life and journey, Chinenye shows that a young person’s worth is not predicated on society’s demands and norms. Her blunt refusal to be seen, as just another usual young person is rare in her generation, and in her book lies vital lessons young people can draw from.