‘Signing Peace Accords are Political Showbiz’

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Idumonza Isidahomhen
 MONDAY DISCOURSE
The Social Democratic Party, Edo Central Senatorial nominee, Mr. Idumonza Isidahomhen, argues that the gatekeepers of Nigerian security organisations have been compromised and exude trappings of partisanship

What can be done to diffuse the prevailing tension as a result of activities of politicians towards the 2019 elections?

Rising tension are rampant occurrence in the runoff to any political contest. And it’s certainly prevalent in every clime.

However,  it could often time get pretty much pensive if there are no operational measures installed to checkmate such possibility.

And in a volatile nation like Nigeria where ethno religious and politically inspired crises have soared unrestrained in the last few years, and even now quite evident by the latest third place ranking on the global terrorised nations chart, the Nigerian people now have a reasonable reason to be worried as the tides of 2019 approaches.

By standard, the security agencies would have been expected to design a protocol to ensure politicians don’t explore incitements and instigations. Unfortunately, the gatekeepers of Nigerian security organisations have been compromised and exude trappings of partisanship.

And perhaps, until we can have a balanced security institution that handles both politicians within and outside the ruling party with same measure of steel, diffusing political tension may be herculean.

How can we sustain the spirit of the recent peace accord by presidential candidates of the political parties,  without making it a ritual every four years? 

For the Nigeria political scene to breath the air of peace and even one that is projected for a long term, it all still rest in the oars of the security institutions. No other agency of government is entrusted with such responsibility other than the security institutions under the command of the President as Commander-in-Chief.

The act of signing peace accords are simply political showbiz. Only an independently strong security institution with sufficient operational and personnel resources can guarantee political peace that supersede the prevailing standard in today’s Nigeria.

How do we get the electorate to trust in institutions like the police and the judiciary?

The antecedence of the Nigerian police in the most recent elections in Ekiti and Osun unveil an institution undeserving of the slightest iota of trust.

It’s hard, maybe even impossible to work the minds of the electorate to trust the police that have unequivocally displayed frontal disregard for the same law they are paid to enforce and same people they’ve been deployed to protect.

The judiciary has shown better deliverables compared to the police and to a large extent there’s still hope to hold on to and build upon.