LASG: Yoruba Now Mandatory for Admission into Tertiary Institutions in Lagos

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Gov. Akinwunmi Ambode
  • Says violation will attract N500,000 or outright closure
  • Mandates teaching of Yoruba Language in all primary, secondary schoolsGboyega Akinsanmi

All candidates seeking admission into all tertiary institutions in Lagos State must henceforth possess credit in Yoruba Language, the state Yoruba Language Preservation and Preservation Law has said.

The law, which became effective last Thursday, would now make compulsory for all primary and secondary schools – private or public – in the state to include teaching of Yoruba Language as a core subject at all levels.

The state Governor, Mr. Akinwunmi Ambode, had formally signed a bill into law “to provide for the preservation and promotion of the use of Yoruba Language and for connected purposes,” thereby making it the first state to enact law seeking to preserve and promote its indigenous language. 

He signed the law alongside the Attorney General and Commissioner for Justice, Mr. Adeniji Kazeem, Commissioner for Energy and Mineral Resources, Mr. Olawale Oluwo, his Information and Strategy counterpart, Mr. Kehinde Bamigbetan and the Commissioner for Finance, Mr. Akinyemi Ashade, among others.

 He equally signed six other bills into laws: the Amended Land Use Charge bill, School of Nursing bill, Cooperative College bill, Cancer Research Institute bill, Amended Customary Court bill and the State Electric Power Reform Law on the same day.

However, the Yoruba Language Preservation and Promotion law provides that all the laws in the state “will be translated into Yoruba Language. Moreso, all state-owned tertiary institutions are to incorporate the use of Yoruba Language in the General Studies (GNS) courses.

“The use of Yoruba language shall be an acceptable means of communication between individuals, establishment, corporate entities and government in the state if so desired by the concerned. It shall not be an offence for a person to speak Yoruba language by the state government,” the law reads in part.

Specifically, the law stated that any school in Lagos State that “fails to comply with the provisions of Section 2 commits an offence and is liable on first violation to issuance of warning and on subsequent violation be closed down and also pay a fine of N500,000.”

After the governor approved the legislation, Bamigbetan explained the socio-cultural value of the Yoruba Language Preservation and Promotion Law, 2018, which according to him, is the first of its kind in Nigeria.

With the new law, Bamigbetan said Yoruba language “has become mandatory for all candidates seeking admission into our tertiary institutions. Yoruba will now become a major requirement to engage in normal business communication in Lagos State.

“This is a clear and conscious commitment to the position which Lagos State prides Yoruba language as the cultural vehicle for us to be able to articulate our position and it also shows that Lagos has further recognised the importance of language as a vehicle for development.”

He said anyone seeking admission into the Lagos State University, Lagos State Polytechnic, Michael Otedola College of Primary Education, Adeniran Ogunsanya College of Education, Lagos State School of Nursing and Lagos State College of Health Technology, among others must have credit in Yoruba language. 

  • Temi Wright

    This bill started a discussion on Facebook and I wrote a lengthy opinion response on why I think this can be a welcomed idea. Please read below if you care to:

    To arguments against states adopting similar regulations for their indigenous languages, keep in mind that in the US for example, there is a huge difference in application procedures and fees for in-state vs out of state students. In other words, tertiary education favors you if you are from that state.

    On the other hand, English is also not an official language in the US (bet you didn’t know that) yet, without it, you cannot secure employment in most parts of the US. Added to that is the requirement to have competence in Spanish (or a different “local” language depending on where in the US you are) to secure a job.

    The arguments advocating for unity are laudable but I do not see how requiring Yoruba makes a graduate less competitive or makes the educational system warped. As a matter of fact, it may make it better. You can read on the intellectual advantages of being bi- or multi-lingual. In addition, it sets the pace for promoting interest in our local language which is currently being eroded. While we are throwing ours away, Africans and African Americans in the diaspora are spending thousands of dollars to acquire competence in the same languages we are saying we do not need.

    I won a global scholarship because of Yoruba. Not any of my other skills, but primarily because of competence in Yoruba. Now imagine if I had failed to see the opportunity it holds? Imagine how many more graduates will have the opportunity I have had and become even more competitive on a global scale?

    (By the way, I studied English and have near native competence in it.)

    In my opinion, it is okay for each state to make laws that extol its indigenous values and benefits its indigenes. Today you clamor against Yoruba. What if it was Chinese they had made compulsory (as we already do make English a requirement)? Will you be as opposed to it? Won’t same students learn Chinese “to become competitive at admissions”?

    Let’s leave bias aside, it is a sense making development. However, as some have pointed out, the Lagos state government should put other incentives in place and facilitate the learning of Yoruba through programs and research on language teaching techniques. The Chinese have the Confucius institute at Unilag and in many institutions around the world. They use cultural (and entertaining) programs to attract students. The government should learn something from their approach. The law may seem harsh but we will benefit in the end. I also think that the law should make it compulsory starting in 2021 to allow those who are currently in senior secondary school pass through since it was not a part of the schools’ curriculum to make them pass Yoruba. For those in Jss3 onwards, they can then start preparing them for Yoruba with the same energy they do English and the other subjects.

    I think that if every state adopts this, it will have inadvertent effects. Schools may become better since there might be a higher demand on local/state schools as students may prefer writing exams in a language they already know. The increased demand may have the effect of increasing state spending on tertiary education and hopefully, bring about more spread out educational development.

    On the other hand too, the language and cultural curriculum will not be as limited as it currently is. What I mean by this is that currently, Yoruba is probably only taught in Yoruba states and Igbo in Igbo states. I think when this becomes a law for all states, schools will widen their curriculum and offer more language options with demand from those students who want to go to school out of state. Essentially, they’ll be responding to the demand for unity that many raise here. In other words, if we borrow from social-psychology theory, there is in-group preference which is what we suffer in Nigerian sense of ethnicity but often, this is because we do not know (nor try to know) those we consider out-group (other ethnic groups) relying instead on stereotypes and biases. If I live in Imo and I want to go to Unilag and I know I need to learn Yoruba language and culture, I start taking classes in the language and likely with people who are Yoruba too. This breeds cultural diplomacy.

    Political scientist & former head of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government who conceptualized “soft power” in 1990, Joseph Nye, tells us that cultural diplomacy is the most effective form of diplomacy (Nye, 2008). It is aimed at winning hearts and minds. It is longer, harder but the results are better at building long-term relationships. More than 700, 000 people have been part of US exchange programs including global leaders: Margaret Thatcher, Helmut Schmidt, Anwar Sadat among others (Nye, 2004, 2008). This cultural diplomacy is supposed to be the outcome of the NYSC; it is the same reason China invests so much into the Confucius institutes around the world, same reason Japan offers exchange programs for high school teachers and the same reason there are scholarships like the Fulbright in the US, Rhodes in the UK and Erasmus in the EU in general. Canada also has several exchange programs for high school students, college students and young adults.

    Essentially, if we develop this idea in this direction, your fears will have the opposite effect. We will learn more about one another, promote our indigenous languages, raise a generation of students who have competence in and appreciation for their own language (as well as the others) and we will save these languages from extinction.

    Yes there should be incentives and not too harsh an approach by the Lagos state government but essentially, with this, we could build unity and highly competitive graduates.

    (Sorry it’s so long.)

  • Aphrodite Oti

    Theres is nothing bad in preserving local languages. High time proactive actions are taken along this line.

    From the comments, Lagos state government ought to make provisions for the issues raised such as natural or circumstantial tone deafness, non indigenes etc. Bearing in mind the success of Lagos state lies in the cosmopolitan nature of the people living within which has led to the massive development thus far.

  • The Observer

    While it is important for the Yoruba people to maintain a sense of their culture, language and progressive traditions, This law is should not be a priority at the moment, I feel it is useless and is unlikely to achieve its aim, how do they intend to monitor admissions processes of different tertiary institutions. It would have been better is there was an incentive to learning the language, that way even non-Yoruba speaking citizens of Lagos state would be inspired to learn the language.

    Now that being said, some on this forum have mentioned that this law will not promote unity in this nation, I laff in all the languages in Nigeria and ask the question, What has ever promoted Unity in this country? Since the 1st republic to military coups, to biafra war, political appointments, boko-haram, to fulani herdsmen, to MEND, to resurgence of IPOB. Nothing! So this law is not doing what is already not happening, that is lack of unity.

    Chairs!

  • Akhabue

    Who are the aboriginal inhabitants of Eko?

  • ifajana

    This is a great development. It doesn’t matter how many are those who kicked against it.
    I know some people can not sacrifice anything and that’s why integration becomes very difficult for most African immigrants in places like Germany, Holland, Austria, Spain, Portugal and so on.
    We are not ready to sacrifice anything for the sake of proper integration. And that’s why you find African immigrants in those countries doing menial and factory jobs. When you see a black man who works in a bank in Germany, Spain, Italy or Austria, he must be the husband of a citizen, not an immigrant, because an immigrant feels its a waste of time to imbibe the language and culture of his|her host, therefore reducing himself to menial job seeker. You are more intelligent when you chose to inculcate the culture of your host to yours, it broadens you, it opens many doors.
    And to those who misunderstood the whole thing in the new law, please, note that the laws are for and affects Lagos state, not federal. So don’t expect Abuja to enact same law.
    If you understand how development do begins you will not get this new laws wrong. I wish it works out well, may be the next step would be , writing chemistry, physics and maths subjects books and teaching in Yoruba language. What about that one?. Butrus Butros Gali, an Egyptians, former UN sec, Banki moon did not study in English language yet, they represented the whole world.
    Its time we begin to see beyond our nostrils. I will not waste my time to learn Igbo Edo language, should i decide to relocate to either zone. Only people with broad mind understand this type of things.

  • Afrikan Couture (AC)

    A dupe pupo lowo ijoba ipinle Eko. Ile Yoruba ko ni parun. Ase.

  • gboyegaa

    I do not support this law as it is and I believe its goal can be achieved also if they exempt other tribes or allow other tribes to have just a pass or an elementary Yoruba language certificate.
    For the Nigerians that say Lagos is a no man’s land and that they own most businesses and houses in Lagos, which I guess is likely to be one of the annoying reasons why some crazy politicians pull such a bill together, I believe those class of Nigerians will now understand that when you begin to lay claim to what does not belong to you, you force the owner to take unthinkable extreme measures to prove and retain ownership.
    Now, here we are at a cross-road, it is f**king clear who the owners of the land are and f**king crazy for owners to enact a f**cking law.
    Excuse my language but it’s all just f**king crazy. -:)

  • MANOFgod

    This is completely senseless. You can not suddenly disenfranchise a current student who has ambitions into one of these schools at such short notice. If you must enact such law, then it should only come into effect in about six year’s time, giving any prospective students adequate forewarning.

  • Anthony Umezinne

    This law will not promote unity amongst Nigerians because it implies that only people born in Yoruba land can secure admission in such institutions. If other tribes adopt the same law, where then is our unity as a country. Education is meant to bring people from diverse cultures to interact for the universality and promotion of academics. It is wrong to exclude people who are not certificated in your local language that is not your lingua franca from accessing your high institutions. Other Nigerians bred in non Yoruba states or even non Nigerians should not be denied academic pursuits in your institutions because they have not passed a local language which is not the language of communication in the country. Lagos State University should by this law know that it would be difficult for them to secure an international student because of credit requirement in Yoruba language.This law inadvertently has localised your higher institutions to the exclusion of other young minds from other climes looking for academic spaces to extend their horizon. Other states should please refrain from replicating this type of law in their states because it is against the spirit of what higher education stands for.

    • The Observer

      You are correct that it will not promote unity. You should also note that nothing has really promoted unity in this country since the 1st republic to biafra, boko-haram, to fulani herdsmen, to MEND, to resurgence of IPOB. Nothing! So this law is not doing what is already not happening, that is lack of unity.

    • YemiO

      When you go to Germany, China or Russia to study, you learn their language because you must. It is the demand of the state, live with it.

      • Anthony Umezinne

        You learn the language of communication in that country, which is their lingua franca. In Nigeria ours is English and not Yoruba. For example if a Russian or a student from Angola comes to Lagos State University to school he will learn English which is our language of communication. By this law he is also required to get a credit in Yoruba language before starting his course of study. There lies the anomaly.

      • Emerem

        Those are the nation’s acceptable official language. What is Nigeria’s national language?

        • YemiO

          I grabbed this for you online, I cannot post hyperlinks but you can Google “local language requirement for University”:
          “Unlike the US where English is spoken by the majority of people, Europe is home to people from a number of different cultures, each with their own unique language. So to succeed and make the most of your education, it will be necessary to learn the local language. While the classes themselves will be taught in English, if you known the local language you will be able to interact better with your professors and local; thereby opening up new avenues and opportunities in your line of study i.e. give yourself a huge competitive edge when compared to your classmates. Additionally most universities in Europe (where English is not the primary language used), require knowledge for admissions, make it a necessary requirement, will reject your application for admission if you do not know the local language.”

          • Emerem

            Hia, bro, I tire for you o. Is Europe a country or continent? US is only a country and cannot be compared to Europe in this context! Please compare Europe with Africa or North / South America / Asia. In Europe, the only countries with English as official language are UK and Ireland (Malta has a mix of Maltese and English) . Is German described as local language or the national language of Germany? Europe has countries, and each country has a national language. Same with Africa; we have countries e.g., Nigeria and Nigeria has a national language. Russia as a country speak the Russian language, Sweden speak Swedish, etc.

          • YemiO

            I get your drift. Africa is unique because unlike Europe where nations formed according to predominant ethnic groupings, Africa was force formed according to the Colonial Master’s will. So we do not have Odua stretching from South West Nigeria to Benin Republic or Arewa, Biafra etc. However there remains a determination by every major ethnic group yo sustain its culture, whether in Europe where they exist as nations or Africa where they exist as groupings of states across nation. The artificial boundaries of nations cannot wish away

  • shakara123

    This is a very bad idea that will come back to haunt the LASG.

    • Adrianne Lobuta

      Baseless statement.

      • shakara123

        Have you considered that given that Lagos is home to a variety of ethnicities , this law sells the idea of clannishness. It may be also serve as the basis for bigotry against non yorubas.
        In a continent that has struggled with unity, aren’t there better ways of preserving the language than outright take it or leave it laws that serve to engender an atmosphere where there is fear of domination.
        Have the leaders/people of Africa learned nothing from History. Shame!!!!

  • Gom

    Welcome development I hope and wishes my state will follow Lagos soon

  • Samuel Okezie

    Making a credit in Yoruba language should be ‘beans’…..wait till complex languages like the Ekoi , Igbo or Annang make the same request. There is a reason English is the official language. If the Governor has genuine intentions, he should simply target the young at primary school level, that way all kids growing up in Lagos would become sufficiently fluent in the language by the time they are teenagers.

    • Adrianne Lobuta

      so what is the use of a complex language like Ekoi, Igbo or Annang that cannot be effectively employed for easy communication?

      • Samuel Okezie

        What’s your point? Only the easy ones should be learnt or preserved?

      • shakara123

        So in your mind, Yoruba is an easy language. How so?

  • Okunwa

    Methinks the law should have been designed, implemented or effected at the primary & post primary levels. A policy of “Catch them young” will be more effective if preservation of language & culture is the primary reason.
    As it were, it appears targeted at non Yorubas’ or those not domicilled in Yoruba land who may want to study in Lagos for higher education as is the generally accepted norm worldwide.
    It is therefore a discriminatory law.

    • OshyLike

      The Federal Universities are there as an option. The law does not affect those institutions. This is the beginning of restructuring at State Level. After all we all own Lagos State!!!!!

      • Ajayi Ayobamidele

        Full Speech Delivered by President Buhari at Kano in Hausa language

        • KPOBS4LIFE

          I never thought Ambode and the whole Lagos state house of assembly could be this dumb and stupid. Just when the federal government is perfecting a bill to remove state of origin and put state of residence in documents, Lagos state is passing this obnoxious, stupid law that will definitely not see the light of day.
          What exactly are they hoping to achieve with this law ?
          You can imagine how chaotic and confusing it will look like when other states follow this very stupid example of Lagos state

          • OLUWASEYI OTOKITI

            “I never thought Ambode and the whole Lagos state house of assembly could be this dumb and stupid……” This is not a good way to talk back at someone @KPOBS4LIFE.
            Same and even worst is practised in the North but no one talks about it.
            This is just a simple way to claim Lagos state by the Yorubas and for the Yorubas.
            Seriously, Yorubas especially the Lagosians are loosing the great identities and values of Yoruba. Like @shakara123:disqus opines “Have you considered that given that Lagos is home to a variety of ethnicities…” It is a truth, but if the Yorubas are not careful, the Ibos, perhaps the Hausa-Fulani herdsman, will someday claim and occupy Lagos just like Ilorin as being snatched from the Yorubas.

  • Freee speech

    Wonderful! God Bless Ambode! I am particularly thrilled by this! May God grant him the desires of his heart as he has granted this policy!!!
    Without this, our language will simply just die off and be taken over by pidgin english or even english language. Many kids born and bred in lagos today can not even speak their mother tongue which is the yoruba language!

    • Truth Konveyor

      It is a law that excludes other Nigerians that cannot speak Yoruba. If other states begin to pass laws that will accommodate only their indigenes, the bigotry, parochialism, tribalism, and hatred that pervades the psyche of our youths today will be a child’s play to what they will become in the coming years. Today, I can appreciate and value Nigerians from every tribe because I had the privilege of studying in the ancient city university – University of Ibadan. I could have missed that opportunity if there was a divisive and discriminatory law like this in place.
      I believe that there could be other more inclusive and unifying way to nurture and promote Nigeria local languages than the way this law is framed.

      • El_Komo

        The law only applies to State Institutions. Federal run Institutions are not affected

        • Ajayi Ayobamidele

          Nigerians do not read well. Buhari visited Kano and he spoke in Hausa language throughout

        • Truth Konveyor

          And you honestly think I didn’t know that?
          The law should have, for the sake of national unity and cohesion, exempted non Yorubas and it will still achieve same effect. Those who condemned Sharia laws in the northern states cannot now be speaking with both sides of their mouths in approving and promoting this obnoxious law.

          • The Observer

            I think is it unTRUTHful and naive if we believe that there can really be unity or a sense of Nationality and oneness in this country. This law is actually an outcome of that sentiment, that there is NO ‘TRUE’ identity of our people as Nigerians, but rather as either Northerners, South-Westerners, Easterners, Niger deltians etc (if there is anything like that)

    • Emerem

      Very Retrogressive law. Shows how smart our ruling class is. It is Ok to comms in Yoruba in a diverse place of work? Think of a scenario where the government of the FCT enacts similar law and says Hausa has become the language of comms! So when a foreigner who do not understand Yoruba comes into Lagos he would hire interpreters? When countries such as China are learning English and inculcating into their system to ease business we are talking about law to protect Yoruba language? Let them also make it the language for teaching children in primary and secondary school.

      • YemiO

        FCT cannot because it is FCT

        • Emerem

          Do you honestly think the law is progressive? You can address the main themes I brought out – can they teach kids in Yoruba? Because if the idea is to make the language a ‘central’ language of interaction in Lagos, that is invariably making it the ligua franca, which i don’t dispute, but not as long as Lagos is not yet its own country! Making it a compulsory SUBJECT in primary and secondary school is understandable but making it a prerequisite for admissions into the tertiary institutions / or part of the general studies is extremely uncalled for. What would studying that add to an engineering or medical student, for instance? As a nation we are not forward thinking or ready for cohesion, imo.

          • YemiO

            Yes I think the law is progressive. Sometimes, irrespective of what we do there is a group that will feel short-changed. The indigenous people of Lagos have no other place, government or institution that can champion their cause or preserve their culture. That responsibility rests firmly on the shoulders of the state government. Unity must not destroy diversity. The FG pursues our unity through Unity Schools and Federal Universities, the state universities find their niche in addressing the peculiar education needs of the people. Presently Lagos State has adult literacy classes, who will teach those if those educated by Lagos State cannot bridge the gap? I would actually like to see other states follow in like manner.

          • Emerem

            I respect your opinion and rest my case,…but one last thing, a suggestion though: next time you respond to comments here, write it in Yoruba.

          • YemiO

            Emerem, mo ti gbo!(as you requested).😁

          • YemiO

            So, now that I have fulfilled your request about “next time”, may I continue in English? Seriously, the problem of our people, and indeed Africans, is confidence. Have you noticed that all the leading nations of the world have confidence in their culture? They instruct, learn and research in their language. Language is a cultural element which restores the confidence of a people. Colonisation cannot be rolled back without deliverance from foreign language which is a mark of cultural conquest. Pity the people whose language is insufficient to educate them and to communicate with their God.

          • Freee speech

            Wow! “pity the people whose language is insufficent to educate them and to communicate withtheir God”…….What an amazing and absolutely mind blowing insight! very thought provoking!!!…….and pure truth! Your talk about confidence is so so so true!

          • Emerem

            YemiO, I was very happy when you fulfilled my request, but not so happy that you reverted back to English language. That said, you have been very civil in your comments, and I do not see reasons why we cannot feed off each other. Same cannot be said of Mr Free Speech who started responding to my comments by letting me know ‘I say what I don’t know,’ when he lacks ‘confidence’ in his own name and can’t even add a part of it to his profile. I won’t dignify him with a response.
            That said, Africans are confident people and believe in their culture. I am not against teaching kids Yoruba or making it a central language but it makes absolutely no sense to do so in a country that wants to grow, root out nepotism and be seen as a unified country. Someone is talking about Mandarin and forgot that Mandarin is the official language of China – not a regional language, not any of the state’s language.
            In Africa, South Africa has beautiful languages but adopted English as a central language and official language if you like. Likewise, Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Egypt, Libya Israel, Germany and every other country one can think off – you adopt one official language of teaching, and for use in place of work. What does that do? It fosters unity and growth.
            I recently decided to study why there are so many strife in Africa and decided to do reverse research to find out a common denominator for peaceful countries – they all speak one language, or at least do official business with one language. Was I surprised?
            No one is canvassing that any of our languages should be lost, but we cannot grow as a nation by imposing any of the local languages in the state as ‘the language’. Learnt any lessons from the ‘tower of babel’ experience? To prevent men from achieving anything, confuse their tongues!

      • Freee speech

        I am confident that by the grace of God, it will be thee medium of teaching in at least primary schools within the southwest before I die…do not come here and say what you do not know….in china, they very much cherish and norture their first language which is mandarin. Iran in january of this year changed there schooling system to make it mandatorry for primary schools to teach everything in their local language of farsi….English is only but a language just like my yoruba is…why then should mine be relegated to the background or made second rate to the white man`s? do you know there are parts of Nigeria where students are banned from speaking in their mother tongues? As in our local languages are deemed to be vernacular??? Not in germany or korea o, but in our own country for goodness sake!!!
        What nonesense!!!!! Isnt that where continued colonisation and brain washing to believe that all things african or traditional is second rate and thereby promoting a culture of inferiority complex that leads to us turning on our tvs and radio stations and listening to nigerian presenters and broadcasters s who have lived all their lives in Nigeria still fiegning and forming very ludicrous british/american accents to the detriment of their God given nigerian accents and intonations. When i first went to live in england as a student, i noticed my nigerian folks in uni all trying to speak like the british people but i equally noticed with amazement that the east africans and south africans, namely ugandans, kenyans and tanzanians never made such attempts..they spoke so confidently in their east african accents and so also the jamaicans who were not born in england…..for me, their confidence was simply inspiring and infectious!! language na language, keep yours and dont try to stop me from keeping mine! Simple

  • OkonOnonokpono

    Downright discriminatory! How does this blend with equal opportunity and right of all persons living and working in Lagos who don’t speak Yoruba?

    • Freee speech

      Tough luck. You dont have to live in Lagos. If we have to pick between preserving our cultural heritage and being fair, then the answer will always be the preservation of our culture and values. No apologies over that. As anyone who has lived in Germany…although the average german can speak english, but they will rarely speak to you in english…they will say in their language, “this is dutch land, and you must speak dutch”……and accordingly, in yorubaland, yoruba language must be spoken…

      • OkonOnonokpono

        I have been an advocate of supporting the learning of two Nigerian languages in the WAEC curriculum but most Yorubas will not attempt to learn other Nigerian languages, rather they make fun of them. Most Yorubas have a parochial mindset and this kind of law will make it worse. It does bother me because I want to see a Nigeria where there is equity and everybody given equal treatment no matter where he comes from. It’s another complication to an already complicated situation in a complicated Country. The case in Germany, they have fought two wars in modern history against the English and the English have won both. Germans don’t like the English. The ordinary German loathes the English. However, when I visit Germany for a conference, the medium is usually English.
        We should understand each other wherever we travel to in Nigeria. It is one Nation and one destiny. It is embarrassing to see a worker at Calabar International Airport say to an enquirer ‘ba turanchi’ – I don’t speak English, and he gets away with it. Nigeria is bigger than us.

        • Adrianne Lobuta

          The law does not proscribed English language. You are free to speak it.
          What the law seeks to do is to simply revive and entrench Yoruba language. If you like go to Anambra and lobby the HoA to enact a law that preserves Igbo in your socio-cultural discuss. No crime committed.

          • FrNinja

            Why at university level? It makes more sense to require yoruba or use it as a medium of instruction in public primary schools then english at secondary and university level. Then you have more impact on residents.

      • Truth Konveyor

        German is an official national language in Germany just as we have English language in Nigeria. So, your comparison is off the mark.

        • Adrianne Lobuta

          Free speech is talking sense. @@TruthKonveyor:disqus do you have ethnic ‘Nigerian’ the same way you have ethnic ‘German’? The case is closed if you can truthfully answer that question.

    • OshyLike

      Since they have been using Federal might on us and even not adhering to Federal Character to the detriment of knowledgeable Nigerians, let them use their own power on their Federal Schools, until restructuring, which is inevitable. After all, some said they owned Lagos, or Nigeria with certain poor quality Professors. The game is just begining.

    • Adrianne Lobuta

      Now it will be clear if Lagos belongs to some people or is a no man’s land. The Yoruba’s are passing a message.

      • El_Komo

        This is the message.

  • oyelekan solomon solomon adelo

    Good one.