The six regions in Nigeria

Recently, there were renewed calls by eminent Nigerians, including a former vice-president, for the restructuring of the country, with more power and resource control devolving to the six regions to make them generate more revenue for development, while the centre remains constant albeit less powerful than before. To you, is this restructuring formula the panacea to revive and boost Nigeria’s development process?

ABIMBOLA AKOSILE

* Restructuring is a vital solution to Nigeria’s development problems. In advanced nations, regions are so empowered to be self-sufficient and independent that the function of the government at the centre is more or less ceremonial but focused and efficient. Resources pooled together at the centre resolve all sorts of emergency situations and sundry. It (restructuring) is overdue in Nigeria.
– Mr. Apeji Onesi, Lagos

* Yes, it is.
– Mr. Utibe Uko, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State

* While restructuring for better and more effective governance is desirable, restructuring cannot and must not be positioned as the one solution to the problems we have in Nigeria. As long as we do not change our rent seeking, welfarist – socialist mentality, we will not develop even if we restructure. The scourge of corruption, incompetence and indolence of both the leaders and the led are not factors that aid development. A comparison of Nigeria with countries at par in terms of resources reveals this fact. Further comparison with countries below us in terms of resources, natural, human etc. validates the point. We should not expect any gains from restructuring from the present crop of Nigerians. We need more than restructuring.
– Mr. Aiyegbusi Abiodun, Water Engineer, Lagos State

* A former number two citizen has suggested Nigeria’s restructuring; good call coming from him. However sincerity of purpose is paramount and very vital; as with everything government the candour is the sticking point. There should be no ulterior motives please; Nigeria must progress!
– Mr. Ekwenjo Iheanyi Chukwudi, B.A.R. Associates, Trademore Estate, Apo, Abuja

* Restructuring might not necessarily mean separate or co-federating, it means changing the way we do thing as a country, as a people…attitudinally.
– Mr. Sonysurf Okobi, Lagos

* .The call for restructuring of Nigeria has been going on for years, especially by people of the South. But the North has always resisted this noble suggestion. They have continued to prefer the over-centralisation of power and resources at the centre. The present situation has never helped in furthering the development process of all the federating units, notably the minority Niger Delta (South-south). It is too late to talk of restructuring again, because of the political and economic injuries the present structure of the country has inflicted on some parts of the federation, with the Niger Delta as the worst affected. It is now a loud song of disintegration in the South-east for Republic of Biafra, in the South-south for Republic of Niger Delta, in the Middle Belt for Federal Republic of Middle Belt, and in the South-west a few voices have been raised in quest for Republic of Oduduwa.
– Mr. Neville Kikpoye-Jonathan, President, Abua National Associates, Amalem-Abua, Rivers State

* No, it isn’t, but lack of politics based on patriotism, nationalism, character and service to humanity.
– Mr. Feyisetan Akeeb Kareem, Coordinator, CDHR, Ogwashi-Ukwu, Delta State

* Nothing else would be appropriate for Nigeria at this auspicious time than total restructuring, if this geography is to remain one and continue to exist. Nigeria as an entity has never had it so bad since these different groups were brought together. Regionalism that was practised in the first republic has been adjudged the best system of government ever practised and a return to that through restructuring will go a long way to rekindle the hope of the populace of this geography. A full implementation of 2014 resolutions of the National Conference will save Nigeria
– Mr. Okechukwu Ikonne, Ogbor, Oke-Ovoro Mbaise, Imo State

* Yes of course, with restructuring, all our developmental problems are half-solved.
– Mr. Abimbolu Ogunbanwo, Lagos State

* Restructuring is a good and timely option but my worries are the sorry state of our labour unions and related bodies, resource control and ethnicity drawbacks on Nigeria. Our collective and genuine unity is begging for urgent attention. Pooling resources together from the various regions requires absolute honesty and not sabotage. Too much power at the centre nurtures rebellion; therefore restructuring is vital. God bless Nigeria.
– Miss Apeji Patience Eneyeme, Badagry, Lagos State

* Restructuring is the best solution to Nigeria’s development problems. The centre is too powerful and there is the need to delegate authority to the six geo-political zones; if the country is to develop.
– Hon. Babale Maiungwa, U/Romi, Kaduna

* There is too much power and resources at the centre. The states should be given higher allocations and more responsibilities. Implementation should be a gradual process though. Eventually only finance, foreign affairs, defence and security should be in the hands of the federal government. A good start would be in the mining sector. Fayemi, the Minister of Mines, has suggested mineral-producing states to be given the 13 per cent derivation that oil-producing states get. This will help check the activities of illegal miners and provide incentives for state governments to closely protect and monitor mining activities within their states, since they will be direct beneficiaries.
– Mr. Buga Dunj, Jos, Plateau State

* After all, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, who made the call for restructuring, is part of the APC membership. Let him bring ideas on how to restructure Nigeria that every citizen will enjoy under PMB’s government.
– Mrs. Ijeoma Nnorom, Lagos State

* Ethnicity, tribalism, regionalised politicking, and un-patriotism are strong factors that must be addressed first as they affecting our collective unity before restructuring Nigeria can be realistic. We must be more focused and united.
– Ms. Saiki Ometere Tina, Gboko, Benue State

* Restructuring can only be positive for Nigeria because there would now be ample chance to correct past mistakes and ensure a better present and future. Stronger regions will employ comparative advantages to generate more revenue and there would be less dependence on the centre. The onus is whether PMB will buy into this suggestion for the collective good.
– Mr. Olumuyiwa Olorunsomo, Lagos State

* I believe PMB is trying to restructure Nigeria and what he needs is the support of everybody irrespective of party difference to move the country forward. Let us keep our fingers crossed, PMB has a vision for Nigeria; he needs our prayers.
– Mr. Gordon Chika Nnorom, Public Commentator, Umukabia, Abia State

THE FEEDBACK

Yes, it is the solution: 9
No, it isn’t the solution: 1
Others: 6
Radical tip: It is too late!
Total no of respondents: 16
Male: 13
Female: 3
Highest location: Lagos (7)

Next Week: Is Nigeria Now Ripe for State Police?

The Inspector General of Police recently disclosed that the current 317,000 personnel in the Nigeria Police Force are inadequate to protect around 170 million citizens. Although the Federal Government wants to employ 10,000 new officers out of the 300,000 persons undergoing verification and training (911,000 applied in April), there has been clamour for State Police forces, with a subsisting federal force, as being practised in the USA. To help curb nationwide crimes and ensure quality protection of lives and properties, is Nigeria now ripe for State Police or just a bigger federal force, or a combination of both? What do you think?

Please make your response direct, short and simple, and state your full name, title, organisation, and location. Responses should be sent between today (June 16 & Monday, June 20) to abimbolayi@yahoo.com, greatbimbo@gmail.com, AND abimbola.akosile@thisdaylive.com. Respondents can also send a short text message to 08023117639 and/or 08188361766 and/or 08114495306. Collated responses will be published on Thursday, June 23