Kogi Govt Threatens to Sack Striking Doctors over Unpaid Salaries

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By Yekini Jimoh in Lokoja

The Kogi State government on Friday threatened to sack any staff under the state health sector and adopt the policy of ‘no work no pay’ if they fail to resume work.
The threat which was contained in a circular signed by the state acting head of service Mrs. Han- nah Lawal dated 4th May, 2017 indicated that the state government was doing whatever was needful to make sure that all salary arrears of cleared officers were paid within the shortest possible time without any further.
Recall that, the Kogi State
chapter of the Nigeria Medical Association (NMA) on April 3rd, directed its members to embark on an indefinite strike over government’s failure to pay doctors salaries.
The circular with Reference number HCS/MISC/COR/01/ VOL.III/643 to the State Secretary National Association of residents Doctors reads in parts.
“I have been directed to inform all the staff under the Kogi State health Sectors that, the State Government is doing whatever is needful to make sure that all salary arrears of cleared officers are paid within the shortest possible
time without any further delay. “It is equally noteworthy for every Union to know or realise that the best way to resolve any issue is through peaceful dialogue
and not strike action.
“In view of the foregoing, any
Staff of Kogi State that decides to go on strike is hereby notified that he/she will have his/her job at stake.
“The policy of “No work no pay” will be adopted for any worker that embarks on Strike Action”.
Meanwhile, barely 48 hours after the Kogi State chapter of the Nigeria Medical Association

directed its members to go on strike; health activities have been grounded in most hospitals owned by the Kogi State government across the state.

When our correspondent visited the Kogi State specialist hospital Lokoja, the ever busy male and female wards, Surgical ward, Labour ward, Children ward, Maternity Ward, Dental Ward and Eye clinic, Accident and Emergencies ward were empty.

It was discovered that, no doctor was on ground to attend to patients hence the need to discharge them for other private hospitals in the state.