NGO Seeks Inclusion of Entrepreneurship Studies in Basic School Curriculum

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By Kuni Tyessi

A non-governmental organisation, African Kids and Women Rights Initiative (AKAWI) has added its voice to the clamour for curriculum review, stating that entrepreneurship studies should be added from the basic school level.

It said teaching young minds life saving skills through entrepreneurship in basic school curriculum will not only fight against poverty and unemployment, but will prevent frustration and depression as a result of joblessness and not knowing what to do in return.

The Executive Director of AKAWI, Ms. Sherina Okoye, who stated this in Abuja during its empowerment and award ceremony, said a country like China can be used as an example as different trades are taught from childhood and owned by families, adding that this trait has succeeded in lifting almost the entire population out of poverty.

In celebrating women which she said many are unsung heroes as a result of the impactful roles they play in reshaping humanity, as well as demystifying the narratives about the limitations of women, but are not known or celebrated, Okoye said policies and their implementation will help in driving the economy.

She said many young girls today do not have leadership skills and role models to look up to, hence the need to encourage women to tell their stories of failures, hardships and victories in order to inspire, adding that one woman’s past is another woman’s present.

“There is the need to quickly review the Nigerian school curriculum and adding entrepreneurship studies right from the basic level. There is the need to catch them young. We keep saying there are no jobs and there’s poverty. It is as a result of the fact that many are endowed with talents but are bereft of ideas which will translate those talents into money making ventures.

“We rely on too much of certificates in this country and less on business ideas. This is why we are where we are. Take China for example, they emphasise so little on certificates and lay emphasis on grooming talents and bringing out the best from it. That is aside the fact that they teach in their language.

“There are a lot of unsung heroes in our society. We encourage women to speak out as the past of another woman qualifies to be the present of another.

“Women are breaking frontiers and are not celebrated. They are just in their corners and changing the narratives towards positive living. Young girls today hardly have people to look up to and get inspiration. So we are trying to make them bold as well as encourage them to make their name in history,” she said.