Wimbledon 2016: Williams, Murray Hit Next Round

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Defending champion Serena Williams reached the second round of Wimbledon with a 6-2 6-4 win over Switzerland’s Amra Sadikovic.
Top-seeded American Williams served five double faults and only four aces in 73 minutes against the world number 148.
The six-time champion, 34, has now won 80 and lost 10 matches at Wimbledon.

“It wasn’t tougher than I thought, but it was definitely tough,” she told BBC Sport.
“I never underestimate anyone. I started fast, and that’s about it.

“This is me – I’m always shouting at myself, always pushing myself. It’s absolutely nothing different.
“It’s great to be back at Wimbledon. Mom was in the Royal Box and that was really nice.”
The world number one, regarded as one of the finest servers in history, achieved just a 60% success rate on her first serves.
But there was never any suggestion she would not go on to beat the Grand Slam debutant, securing victory with a successful challenge to set up a tie against compatriot Christina McHale.

McHale, who beat Daniela Hantuchova 7-5 6-2, has already lost twice to the 21-time Grand Slam champion in 2016.
Rain disrupted play on the second day, but under a closed roof on Centre Court former world number one Caroline Wozniacki lost 7-5 6-4 to world number 14 Svetlana Kuznetsova in one hour and 28 minutes.

“It was way too good a match for the first round,” the Russian told BBC Sport. “I think I did great, I’m happy with my performance.”
Kuznetsova will now play Britain’s wildcard Tara Moore, who secured her first Grand Slam win with a 6-3 6-2 victory over Alison Van Uytvanck, becoming the fourth Briton to reach the second round.

Former finalist Eugenie Bouchard was leading Magdalena Rybarikova 6-3 2-1 while British number one Johanna Konta was 6-1 2-1 up against Monica Puig when rain stopped play.
Earlier yesterday,Andy Murray made short work of his first ever British opponent at Wimbledon as he swept past wildcard Liam Broady in the opening round.

Murray, seeded second, saw off the 22-year-old world number 235 from Stockport 6-2 6-3 6-4 on Centre Court.
It was the first all-British meeting at the All England Club since Tim Henman beat Martin Lee in 2001.
Murray, 29, goes on to face Yen-Hsun Lu of Chinese Taipei in the second round on Thursday.
The Scot needed just one hour and 43 minutes to end Broady’s Centre Court debut, the 2013 champion and world number two not surprisingly outclassing a player with just one tour-level win to his name.

Murray might have been playing a familiar face but he was in aggressive mood, dropping just six points on his first serve and winning 18 of 19 at the net.
Having gone 10 years without playing a fellow Briton, he has now beaten three this month following wins over Aljaz Bedene and Kyle Edmund at Queen’s Club.

“When we start the match we are both trying to win, but it does not make it any easier,” Murray told BBC Sport.
“Liam played better as the match went on and fought through to the end and played some good stuff.
“The crowd is always very fair here, getting behind both players and knowing what a good shot is. Liam got a good ovation when he left court and I’m sure he will have enjoyed that.”

Broady found himself having to improvise as he chased down Murray from the baseline
Murray, watched by recently returned coach Ivan Lendl at a Grand Slam for the first time in three years, began his 11th Wimbledon campaign with a comfortable win.

Broady, 22, had experienced the Murray game first-hand during practice sessions earlier this year but could not bridge the gulf in class once their first competitive meeting got under way.
Within five minutes he was a break of serve down, and moments later he was literally playing a shot off his knees as Murray ran him ragged.

There was a sense of relief from the Centre Court crowd when Broady got on the scoreboard at 3-1 down but he could make no impression on the Murray serve.
A wayward Broady forehand into the tram lines gave up the first set and a double fault handed Murray a 3-1 lead in the second.

There was little reason for Murray to get fired up but a trademark cross-court backhand brought a shout of “come on” en route to a two-set lead, and it was now a case of closing it out as clinically as possible.
Murray suffered physically in the recent French Open final after getting dragged into two five-set matches earlier in the tournament, and he was determined to avoid a repeat at Wimbledon.

Broady – and the crowd – enjoyed one running forehand pass early in the third set, and the wildcard earned his first break points in game six, but Murray fired down a serve and steered away a volley to snuff out the danger.
A delicate drop shot clinched victory on match point and the value of a quick win was immediately apparent when the rain began to fall as the players walked off court.